Administrative Office 727-824-8181 1344 22nd St South, St. Petersburg, FL 33712 >Directions   
This health center is a Health Center Program grantee under 42 U.S.C. 254b, and a deemed Public Health Service employee under 42 U.S.C. 233(g)-(n). In addition, if the health center is asked who your insurance carrier is for purposes of filing medical malpractice claims, you should respond in writing whenever possible -- by stating that they and many/all of their providers are deemed federal employees, with resultant coverage under the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) for actions within the scope of deemed employment, pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 233(g)-(n). Accordingly, claims or notice of medical malpractice claims should be submitted by a claimant to the Office of General Counsel at the address below. Further, the health center should retain a copy of this correspondence in their office files, rather than in patient medical records. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the General Counsel General Law Division 330 Independence Ave., S.W. Room 4760 Mail Stop: Capitol Place Washington, DC 20201  
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Community Health Centers of Pinellas's mission is to provide quality healthcare services to all.
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Cervical Cancer & Screenings
What is Cervical Cancer Screening? Cervical Cancer Screening is done through a Pap Test during a Pelvic Exam. A Pap Test is done to look for changes in the cells of the cervix. What happens during a Pelvic Exam? A Pap Test is done as a part of a Pelvic Exam.  Your provider takes a small sample of cells from the surface of the cervix using a swab.  The sample is then spread on a slide or mixed in a liquid and sent to a lab for examination under a microscope. The cells are examined for abnormalities that may indicate abnormal cell changes.  The bimanual exam is also a part of the pelvic exam.  During the bimanual exam, your provider examines the pelvic organs. To learn more about how a Pelvic Exam is done, visit the follow link at WebMD: http://women.webmd.com/pelvic-examination?page=2 Why is a Pap Test Important? A Pap Test or Cervical Cancer Screening is important because it allows your provider to check for things that can significantly affect your health like Cancer and Sexual Transmitted Diseases such as: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, HPV (Human Papillomavirus), etc. A Pelvic Exam can help your provider check for yeast infections, the cause of abnormal periods, ovarian cysts Who should have regular Pap Tests? Women should begin having yearly Pap Tests at the age of 21. Your provider can discuss a pelvic exam schedule with you further based on individual needs and circumstances. How do I prepare for a Pelvic Exam? Before a pelvic exam • Try to schedule the exam when you are not having your period, since blood can interfere   with the results of a Pap test. But if you have a new vaginal discharge or new or increasing   pelvic pain, a pelvic exam may be done while you are having your period. • Do not use douches, tampons, vaginal medications, or vaginal sprays or powders for at   least 24 hours. • Do not have sex for 24 hours prior to the exam if you have abnormal vaginal discharge.   Semen in your vagina may interfere with your exam. At the beginning of your visit, tell your provider: • If you are or might be pregnant. • If you have any reproductive or urinary tract symptoms such as itching, redness, sores,   swelling, or an unusual odor or increased vaginal discharge. • If you are using a method of birth control. • If this is your first pelvic exam. • The first day of your last menstrual period and how long your period lasted. • If you have had surgery or other procedures, such as radiation therapy, involving the   vagina, cervix, or uterus. • If you have had problems with pelvic exams in the past or have experienced rape or   sexual abuse, talk to your provider about your concerns or fears before the exam. • No other special preparations are needed before having a pelvic exam. For your own   comfort, you may want to empty your bladder before the exam. For More Information on Cervical Cancer visit WebMD’s Cervical Cancer Health Center online at http://www.webmd.com/cancer/cervical-cancer/cervical-cancer-topic-overview For More Information on Pap Tests and Pelvic Exams visit WebMD’s Women’s Health Center online at http://women.webmd.com/pelvic-examination
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